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Reading Aloud Improves the Reach of Words · Guardian Liberty Voice

Reading Aloud Improves the Reach of Words · Guardian Liberty Voice


Reading Aloud

The writing process is the best way people can fully express themselves by using their thoughts to create sentences. It should be easy to capture ideas into words, but this is not always the case. Writers want to reach all kinds of readers by using words everyone can be comfortable with but this tends to be quite difficult. However, there is one simple way to make it easier —reading aloud.

The objective is to find the right words that would fit in a general language. So what does ”general language” means? Basically it is the whole collective understanding of spoken/written words. This is pretty hard to accomplish as there are so many different cultures. Every region has its own way to write and speak. What can be considered normal in some places might sound weird in other ones. Even so, by reading aloud one can notice when a word is not going to express the writer’s intent. This reading technique will help to identify when a word does not belong in a paragraph.

When the Writer Becomes the Reader

There are two common situations reading aloud will provide. One, when a writer knows certain words might not be understood by readers. Two, when a writer wants to get the right words for everyone understanding. Similar but not equal, each one has its own problems. The reading part is pivotal in order to solve them. On the first one, reading aloud a whole paragraph from the beginning will those unwanted words stand out because the inner feeling of awkward elocution is evident. On the second one, it would take reading the text several times and it will not be as simple as the first.

Peter Elbow’s theory is that reading their own work aloud improves the writer. The purpose is not merely finding uncomfortable phrases. The goal is to create solid sentences that will have impact. When successful, the writer clearly expresses his intent, thereby, improving the reader’s experience.

The Brain’s Way

The human brain has strange ways of processing information. One person  is able to study and learn more by reading silently. Whereas, another will learn better with the use of videos or listening to the words spoken aloud. In the writers’ case, they are accustomed silence. They work better when there is no noise.

Taking a break is an efficient move when the writer feels stuck. This happens all the time with authors. They are used to composing phrases from their thoughts. Reading aloud their script could unlock paths that would best ameliorate their words. In this particular case, creating a stronger sentence.

Even conventional individuals can improve the understanding of texts by reading aloud. To see something is completely different from hearing it and the brain knows this.

It Is for Everyone

Clearly, not only writers can benefit from reading aloud but everyone else does as well. When people are scanning through a text on the internet, usually not much information is retained. This reading technique would prevent that from happening.

It is funny the fact that kids do read aloud more regularly than adults. It could also be a reason to explain why the younger children learn faster. They actually voice out the source of their study and this allows better comprehension. Returning to the previous way of learning is not always regression.

Reading aloud is applicable to anyone who wants to get more from what they read. To make it a habit can genuinely improve the reach of words.

Written by Gian Torres
Edited by Cathy Milne

Sources:

University of Massachusetts Amherst: Revising by Reading Aloud. What the Mouth
and Ear Know
Guardian Liberty Voice: Reading Aloud Improves Language and Relationships
JACKSON NEWSPAPERS: Read Aloud enriches children’s lives

Featured and Top Image Courtesy of Liz West’s Flickr Page – Creative Commons License

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